GreatGre
AKC Registered Greater Swiss Mountain DogsThoughtfully Bred For Great Temperments and Long Healthy Lives


Austinite Swissy Sweet Soul Litter Born 11-28-16

Our Puppies Have Found Wonderful Homes.​​
Currently we have no planned litters.
Feel free to contact me about breeders in your area.
 

    Elwood              Finn            Kona                       Etta          

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Breeder Green Flags



The following are some typical practices and signs of Good Breeders.  
Keep your eyes open when you’re visiting breeders.
Before buying a puppy, take the time to research and find a responsible breeder. 
Puppies from good breeders are more likely to grow up to be healthy,

temperamentally sound dogs.


The dogs live inside. Puppies who are going to be family dogs should be raised inside with the family, not in a backyard, basement, or garage.

The dogs and puppies are relaxed around people. If the parent dogs and puppies seem comfortable with humans, that’s a good sign that they’ve been properly cared for and socialized.

The place is clean. Don’t worry about the dirty dishes in the sink–just make sure the dogs’ living area is safe, sanitary, and that they’re supplied with fresh water, beds, and toys. Is there a toilet area in the puppy’s living quarters, or is it all one big toilet? If it’s the former, the puppies have a head start on housetraining.

The breeder participates in dog shows or competitions. A good breeder is motivated by enthusiasm for the breed, not by making a little extra cash.

The breeder asks you to sign a spay/neuter contract. If you’re buying a dog who’s not going to be bred, the breeder should ask you to sign a contract promising to spay or neuter your pup, to avoid contributing to pet overpopulation.

The breeder doesn’t specialize in sizes or colors that are unusual for the breed. For one thing, extremely small or extremely large dogs are more likely to have health problems. For another, trying to breed for rare colors or extreme sizes is a sign that the breeder is more interested in making money out of a sales gimmick than in producing great puppies.

The breeder is up-front about the breed’s drawbacks, whether that means a tendency to develop certain health problems or a temperament that’s not for every owner. A good breeder wants you to love and care for your new dog for his entire lifetime, and she knows that’s more likely if you’re well prepared.

The breeder wants to meet the whole family and welcomes you to make several visits. To make the best match, the breeder will want to meet everyone who’ll be living with the puppy. And she’ll want you to take the time to make the right decision; high-pressure salesmanship is a red flag.

The breeder asks you lots of questions. This shows she wants to know exactly what kind of home her puppies are going to. She may ask who’s going to be home during the day, what your dog-owning history is, and why you’re interested in the breed. Don’t be defensive; she’s just doing her job, which is taking care of the pups she brings into the world.

The breeder will take the dog back, at any stage of the dog’s life, if you’re unable to care for her. A good breeder will insist on this. Again, she wants to make sure the puppies she brought into the world will always be taken care of.

The breeder won’t let you take the puppy home before she’s eight weeks old. Playing with her littermates teaches your puppy a lot about getting along with other dogs. A puppy who’s taken away from her littermates too early is at a major disadvantage in her canine social skills.



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