GreatGre
AKC Registered Greater Swiss Mountain DogsThoughtfully Bred For Great Temperments and Long Healthy Lives


Austinite Swissy Sweet Soul Litter Born 11-28-16

Our Puppies Have Found Wonderful Homes.​​
Currently we have no planned litters.
Feel free to contact me about breeders in your area.
 

    Elwood              Finn            Kona                       Etta          

Breed History

The origin of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is not definitively known.  The Swiss people themselves cannot be clearly defined as belonging exclusively to one of the European tribes; they are inhabitants of a typical transit country. Beginning in 1515, the remote valleys of Switzerland were more or less isolated from world history for three centuries. Specific dog breeds were created by inbreeding, and puppies were given to neighbors and family members.

There are several theories regarding the origin of the four Sennenhund breeds. The first, most popular theory, states the dogs are descended from the Molosser, a large Mastiff-type dog, which accompanied the Roman Legions on their invasion of the Alps more than 2000 years ago.

A second theory is that in 1100 BC, the Phoenicians brought a large dog breed with them to settlements in Spain. These dogs later migrated eastward and influenced the development of the Spanish Mastiff, Great Pyrenees, Dogue de Bordeaux, and Sennenhund breeds.

A third possibility is that a large dog breed was indigenous to central Europe during the Neolithic Period, when humans grew wild and domestic crops and used domesticated animals.

Whether or not a domesticated large breed existed in the Alpine area when the Romans invaded, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs are almost certainly the result of the mating of native farm dogs with large Mastiff-type dogs brought to Switzerland by foreign settlers. The early ancestors of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog were used by farmers, herdsmen and merchants in central Europe. The breed was bred as a draught dog to pull heavy carts, to guard and move dairy cattle, and as a watchdog and family companion.


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